ductless-fume-hood

What are the Uses of Laboratory Ductless Fume Hoods

Business Health Technology
Please follow and like us:

Fume hoods are enclosed workbenches that are used in laboratories while working with biohazardous materials or chemicals that emit toxic fumes. They prevent the toxic gases and other potentially harmful compounds from escaping into the laboratory and its working area. All sides of a fume hood are covered, except the front where a protective sash is placed.Two types of fume hoods are usually available – ducted, and ductless.

Ducted fume hoods, as the name suggests, are connected directly to a large duct, which in turn is connected to the building or laboratory’s ventilation system. These fume hoods have an exhaust fan that draws in air from the front, pulling all fumes inside the workbench along with it, and then leads them into the duct and out of the building through the ventilation system.

Ductless fume hoods are much different from ducted ones as they are not connected to any duct. This means that they are not attached to any ventilation to let the fumes escape. Instead, they are fitted with a pre filter and a main filter that treat the fumes, and then release clean air back into the room. Thus, they serve the same purpose as ducted fume hoods but through a different mechanism.

Let’s discuss about the ductless fume hoods in detail.

Working Mechanism of Ductless Fume Hoods

When working with hazardous chemicals and specimen inside the ductless fume hoods, the exhaust fan sucks air from the front which also sweeps all the toxic fumes towards the exhaust area. This mixture of air and fume is first passed through the pre-filter, which removes larger compounds and particles. After that, they move on to the main filter where the toxic compounds are trapped and removed so that the air becomes clean, and escapes through the exhaust vents into the room.

However, as the toxic compounds are contained inside the filter, so they will accumulate over time with regular use of the fume hood. Hence, after certain duration, they will need to be inspected and replaced.

Uses of Ductless Fume Hoods

The main purpose of these fume hoods are already mentioned – to prevent toxic fumes emitted by certain chemicals and materials from escaping into a lab or facility. But there are some factors that must be considered seriously while using ductless fume hoods.

  1. They use specific types of filters, which can only treat certain chemical compounds. So the chemicals that can be safely used inside a ductless fume hood depends on the type of filter it has. As a result, they are suitable for limited operations and the operator needs to be aware of what substances they can safely work with inside a specific ductless fume hood.

Ductless fume hoods should not be used for operations where different chemicals must be used regularly, or where the toxic fumes being produced have not been clearly identified.

 

  1. The regular inspection, maintenance and replacement of filters are of utmost importance, since it is a matter of safety of the operators and the laboratory itself. Guidelines and protocols have been laid out by regulatory bodies that mention the longevity and safe usage period of each type of filter. There are certified companies which perform the inspection of filters. These guidelines must strictly be followed when operating ductless fume hoods.Fume hoods are enclosed workbenches that are used in laboratories while working with biohazardous materials or chemicals that emit toxic fumes. They prevent the toxic gases and other potentially harmful compounds from escaping into the laboratory and its working area. All sides of a fume hood are covered, except the front where a protective sash is placed.Two types of fume hoods are usually available – ducted, and ductless.

    Ducted fume hoods, as the name suggests, are connected directly to a large duct, which in turn is connected to the building or laboratory’s ventilation system. These fume hoods have an exhaust fan that draws in air from the front, pulling all fumes inside the workbench along with it, and then leads them into the duct and out of the building through the ventilation system.

    Ductless fume hoods are much different from ducted ones as they are not connected to any duct. This means that they are not attached to any ventilation to let the fumes escape. Instead, they are fitted with a pre filter and a main filter that treat the fumes, and then release clean air back into the room. Thus, they serve the same purpose as ducted fume hoods but through a different mechanism.

    Let’s discuss about the ductless fume hoods in detail.

    Working Mechanism of Ductless Fume Hoods

    When working with hazardous chemicals and specimen inside the ductless fume hoods, the exhaust fan sucks air from the front which also sweeps all the toxic fumes towards the exhaust area. This mixture of air and fume is first passed through the pre-filter, which removes larger compounds and particles. After that, they move on to the main filter where the toxic compounds are trapped and removed so that the air becomes clean, and escapes through the exhaust vents into the room.

    However, as the toxic compounds are contained inside the filter, so they will accumulate over time with regular use of the fume hood. Hence, after certain duration, they will need to be inspected and replaced.

    Uses of Ductless Fume Hoods

    The main purpose of these fume hoods are already mentioned – to prevent toxic fumes emitted by certain chemicals and materials from escaping into a lab or facility. But there are some factors that must be considered seriously while using ductless fume hoods.

    1. They use specific types of filters, which can only treat certain chemical compounds. So the chemicals that can be safely used inside a ductless fume hood depends on the type of filter it has. As a result, they are suitable for limited operations and the operator needs to be aware of what substances they can safely work with inside a specific ductless fume hood.

    Ductless fume hoods should not be used for operations where different chemicals must be used regularly, or where the toxic fumes being produced have not been clearly identified.

     

    1. The regular inspection, maintenance and replacement of filters are of utmost importance, since it is a matter of safety of the operators and the laboratory itself. Guidelines and protocols have been laid out by regulatory bodies that mention the longevity and safe usage period of each type of filter. There are certified companies which perform the inspection of filters. These guidelines must strictly be followed when operating ductless fume hoods.
Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply